We try hard to keep everyone informed about current developments through our...
We try hard to keep everyone informed about current developments through our...
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Robin Hood is New York’s largest poverty-fighting organization, and since 1988...

A joint hearing of the council’s Veterans and Mental Health committees examined an issue probed recently by the Center for Investigative Reporting: a massive national backlog of government benefits for returning veterans.

New York veterans face some of the worst delays in the country, nearly two years in obtaining first-time approvals for government disability benefits available to former servicemen and women injured as a result of their military duties. That’s around twice the national rate.

A steady stream of hands shot in the air as the speaker asked audience members to indicate if they had served their country, beginning with Vietnam and ending post-9/11.

By all accounts, Kris Goldsmith started out as a good soldier.

He enlisted in the Army in 2003, and landed in Iraq two years later. He was trained to direct air and artillery bombardments, but was later given a new job: to chronicle for intelligence officials—in photos, interviews and written accounts—everything his unit encountered.

On May 15, 2005, the unit encountered a mass grave in a trash dump. As Goldsmith took photos in the 140-degree heat, surrounded by sewage, he watched the flies lift off the corpses and land on him.

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